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Author Topic: Honor and Recognition  (Read 1547 times)

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Sage

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Re: Honor and Recognition
« Reply #3 on: Tue, Feb 04, 2014, 19:01 »

All are excellent ideas. "Order of Meriti," "Legion of Theben;" those terms alone give me an adrenaline rush of pride. I agree that continuous education is important, especially since those who share our philosophy tend to be marginalized in, if not omitted, from the LGBT historical narrative.
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Mogul

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Re: Honor and Recognition
« Reply #2 on: Sun, Feb 02, 2014, 01:06 »

A "Hall of Fame" or "Roll of Meriti" could be established - including both the living and the deceased individuals of distinction.

The living can be honored by a "Medal of Merit" or subscribed to the "Order of Meriti". Since creating hierarchies of merit is not really a Gay civilian thing, one grade of merit would certainly do. A distinction can be made for the military boys - they can form ther "Legion of Theben" with ranks and grades, if they wish. 

Giving medals to long-dead people is rather pointless, in my view. To honor the deceased individuals, one would do good to educate the public again and again of who they were, and what made them special. History books are one way to do so, regular articles in magazines another one. Stamps, street naming, and even money can be used for this purpose.

Generally, honoring distinguished individuals (deceased and living) makes much sense. It serves a double purpose: a) expresses public recognition of an extraordinary contribution, and b) inspires other people to greater deeds. Dedication has many sources, and often people need encouragement in times of low spirit and self-doubt. A younger person who knows himself/herself in a good company of greate ancestors will show more persistence in the pursuit of excellency. There is a sense of historical continuity which characterises a nation as contrasted to a mere "population".
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Sage

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Honor and Recognition
« Reply #1 on: Thu, Jan 30, 2014, 20:12 »

This morning I learned that a soldier of Gay Liberation, Gale Chester Whittington, had passed recently. This news inspired an idea. I am wondering if we should consider developing some sort of national honor that we could bestow upon individuals who have contributed in some significant way toward to the formation of Gay self-determination or identity? For clarification think of persons of the caliber of Harry Hay, Don Jackson, and Fred Schoonmaker who are good historic examples of the concept. This would essentially amount to our equivalent of a knighthood or congressional medal of honor.

I think the best way for us to nation build is to simply begin conducting ourselves as a nation as best we can with what we have to work with at this very moment. This concept may present such an opportunity. Nations encourage greatness and simultaneously honor their best and brightest.

Let's hear some ideas. What type of award or recognition should we consider. What type protocol would be followed? Should a ceremony be involved? If so what would it consist of? 
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